Aftercare Instructions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOGS

 

  • Your dog received general anesthesia for surgery. Some dogs may feel nauseous after anesthesia which could cause drooling, loss of balance, vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of appetite for up to 12 hours following surgery.

  • Your goal is to keep the surgery area clean and dry and no exercise beyond simple walks for the next 1-2 weeks. Excessive exercise could rip the suture material below the skin. Keep dogs on a leash for bathroom breaks. No playing in the grass, dirt, or especially in water. No bathing your dog for the next 2 weeks.

  • Your dog received a long-acting injection of pain medication (Rimadyl® or Metacam®) that lasts 24 hours and an antibiotic (Penicillin) that lasts up to 5 days.  Do NOT give your dog any over-the-counter medications, including aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol), as these may be dangerous and even fatal.

  • You may give your dog water and feed it a small meal when you get home. If no vomiting occurs, you may offer its usual amount.

  • A small amount of licking and grooming of the surgical site is considered normal, but observe the animal to ensure it is not chewing, biting, or opening up the incision. If the animal is doing so, we recommend using an Elizabethan collar (E-collar) from a pet store to prevent the dog from opening the incision and keeping it in place for 1-2 weeks.

  • Your female dog was spayed today, which means she had both ovaries and uterus removed and she will not go into heat or get pregnant. Dissolvable stitches are placed under the skin and do not need to be removed. A small dab of skin glue was also used on the outside.

  • Your male dog was neutered today which means both testicles were removed, through an incision just in front of the scrotum. Dissolvable stitches are placed under the skin and do not need to be removed. A small dab of skin glue was also used on the outside.

  • Watch for any excess redness, swelling, tenderness, bleeding or discharge, or opening of the incision at the surgery site and observe to make sure the dog is not overly lethargic. Call (305) 387-0721 if you have any concerns. In the event of an after-hours emergency, call your local veterinarian or an emergency animal clinic.  Any fees paid to an emergency clinic will be the responsibility of the owner; Dr. Kramer will not reimburse any costs.

  • Dog receive a mandatory small green ink tattoo on their belly, or next to their surgical incision, after surgery to indicate they have been spayed or neutered. We anticipate that your dog will have a normal, uneventful recovery.  If you have any questions regarding his/her progress, please call us.

 

 

CATS

 

  • Your cat received general anesthesia for surgery, and must be kept indoors for a minimum of 12-24 hours. Some cats may feel nauseous after anesthesia which could cause loss of balance, vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of appetite for up to 12 hours following surgery. If your cat normally goes outside, do NOT release the cat until the day AFTER surgery.

  • Your cat received a long-acting injection of pain medication (Metacam®) that lasts 24 hours and an antibiotic (Penicillin) that lasts up to 5 days.  Do NOT give your cat any over-the-counter medications, including aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil®) or acetaminophen (Tylenol®), as these may be dangerous and even fatal.

  • You may give your cat water and feed it a small meal when you get home. 

  • Keep the cat confined until the morning after surgery, preventing it from jumping and running. Reducing contact with other animals and children during this time is advisable.

  • Litter pans should be kept extremely clean while the incision is healing.

  • A small amount of licking and grooming of the surgical site is considered normal, but observe the animal to ensure it is not chewing or biting the incision. If the animal is doing so, we recommend purchasing an Elizabethan collar to prevent the cat from opening the incision.

  • Your female cat was spayed today, which means she had both ovaries and uterus removed and she will not go into heat or get pregnant. Dissolvable stitches are placed under the skin and do not need to be removed. It is also possible skin glue was used on your animal. A small bump at the incision site in females is considered normal and this disappears over a few weeks time.

  • Your male cat was neutered today which means both testicles were removed. There are no stitches placed in the skin and the surgery site will heal on its own. A small amount of blood seen on the scrotum when your pet gets home is normal.

  • Watch for any excess redness, swelling, tenderness, bleeding or discharge at the surgery site and observe to make sure the cat is not overly lethargic. Call(305) 387-0721 if you have any concerns. In the event of an after-hours emergency, call your local veterinarian or an emergency animal clinic.  Any fees paid to an emergency clinic will be the responsibility of the owner; Dr. Kramer will not reimburse any costs.

  • Cats may receive a small green ink tattoo on their belly, and/or an ear-tip, after surgery to indicate they have been spayed or neutered. We anticipate that your cat will have a normal, uneventful recovery.  If you have any questions regarding his/her progress, please call us.

 

RABBITS

 

Your rabbit has just been spayed or neutered.  At the start, he/she received a combination of injectable and gas anesthetics to induce sleep.  A combination of long-lasting pain relief was given to prevent any pain.  In females, an incision was made through the skin and abdominal wall (into the abdominal cavity) and the four points where the ovaries and two uterine horns attach were tied off, cut and removed.  The procedure is called an ovario-hysterectomy.  In males, an incision was made just in front of the scrotum and the testicles were removed.  The blood vessels supplying the testicles and other tissues were then tied off to prevent excessive bleeding and the incision was closed.  Because of the seriousness of the operation your rabbit requires and deserves proper care and observation for the next several days. 

 

  • When you bring your rabbit home on the day of surgery he/she will be feeling the effects of the anesthetic.  His/her eyes will have a protective ointment on them and he/she may not be able to see well.  He/she may be feeling a little unhappy and disoriented by his/her trip to the clinic.  While it is tempting to console him/her by petting or cuddling it is best to just leave him/her alone.  It is important this first day that you confine her and disturb him/her as little as possible.  This is equivalent to the strict bed rest you would get in the hospital if you had had surgery.  Keep him/her away from all other animals and children.  The exception is if he/she is part of a bonded pair or group.  Most bunnies know when to rest and not push it too much.  He/she should return to her normal self in a few days.

  • If your bunny is part of a bonded pair or group he/she should not be separated from his/her pal(s).  As long as these bunnies play nicely they may stay with each other.  If they do not play calmly or are being too rough or are mounting they will need to be separated.  Even then they must be able to see, hear, smell and touch each other.

  • This first night especially make sure your bunny is kept warm (but not hot) while indoors.

  • Food is a must the day of surgery – in fact it is critical that she begin and continue eating. Rabbit experts say that bunnies prefer healthy foods such as fresh greens and hay while they are recovering from surgery.  Bunnies also seem to like fragrant herbs such as cilantro, basil, parsley, dill and mint during this recovery period.  You should encourage your rabbit to eat by offering a tempting array of things that are good to eat.

  • Water should always be available for your bunny.  Even if he/she is used to a sipper bottle he/she may not use it if it is too much work for him/her.  During this initial recovery period also provide your rabbit with a heavy ceramic bowl for water.

  • Your rabbit will need to be confined indoors for at least 7 days following surgery and kept as quiet as possible.  Too much activity too soon will disrupt the healing process and can lead to swelling and/or the formation of a fluid pocket under the incision.  If a fluid pocket does form it should go away on its own in a few weeks.

  • Observe the incision daily.  Make sure he/she has not reopened the incision by chewing or scratching at it.    You may notice a small amount of redness and firm swelling.  This is normal and usually resolves in a few weeks.  Rabbits often react this way to internal sutures.   Any drainage or bleeding or excessively large swelling is not normal and should be reported to the clinic.

  • Avoid getting the incision wet for at least 7 days.

  • If your rabbit was pregnant at the time of surgery it may take her longer to recuperate.  She may be slightly anemic and run down.  To help her recover as quickly as possible continue to allow her access to plenty of fresh, clean drinking water and quality rabbit food for the next several days.  For males that were neutered, keep them away from an intact female bunny for a minimum of 4 weeks.  Male rabbits can have viable sperm for several weeks after neutering.

  • You should observe his/her fecal pellets for signs of trouble.  For the first 1-2 days after surgery it is not unusual for the pellets to be soft or mucus-covered. If this persists after day 2 you should see your regular veterinarian immediately. Slowed or no fecal output may indicate an uncommon but serious post-surgical complication.  

  • We use “buried sutures” in rabbits.  This technique requires no removal of the sutures.  They are buried beneath the surface of the skin and will dissolve on their own. It is also possible that skin glue was used on your rabbit.

  • If a problem should develop, contact Dr. Kramer immediately at (305) 387-0721. In the event of an after-hours emergency, call your local veterinarian or an emergency animal clinic.  Any fees paid will be the responsibility of the owner; Dr. Kramer will not reimburse any costs. We anticipate that your rabbit will have a normal, uneventful recovery.  If you have any questions regarding his/her progress, please call us.

 

 

SERVICES

- Spay and Neuter

- Vaccinations
- Microchipping

- Rabies Tags

- Parasite Treatment

- Surgical Procedures
 

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